~ Constance Guisset// Design

I am excited to be sharing the work of the amazing Constance Guisset today. 'Design' is an exhibition of her work as a collective, including explorative models, video & scenography work. You might recognise some of the distinctive lighting details from the Established & Sons scenography from Milan Salone del Mobile 2012 earlier in the year with the draped neon lights. My favourite image is of the suspended light over the stool set within the fantastic scene of the 17th century chapel.
I have posted about Constance Guisset before, including the Sol chair, you can read more here & scenography work 'Conversations avec Afra & Tobia Scarpa', read more here.

Much of Parisian designer Constance Guisset’s work involves movement, a sense of lightness & her work involves visual illusion and surprise to create moving objects, intended to inspire awe and fascinate. Inspiring work!

Photo © Guisset
Photo © Guisset
Photo © Guisset
Photo © Guisset

Photo © Guisset
Photo © Guisset
Photo © Guisset
In the designers words:

Design – Constance Guisset, the first personal exhibition in a 17th-century chapel transformed into an art center, is the opportunity to show the connection between different works in design, scenography and video. 
It also unveils the creation process by presenting hundreds of scale models that illustrate incessant shape experimentation. The nave hosts edited objects. Lamps, armchairs, mirrors, benches, pieces of cutlery, etc. are hung from the ceiling to the ground. The whole scene is visible at first sight but allows the visitor to experience several successive sensations and perspectives. The two lateral chapels are focused on video and scenography. In the first room, the visitor is invited to discover a movie from round sofa made of Mayenne fabric. The second chapel houses a light installation, a drape tailored for the space that illustrates the in situ scenographic work. Just behind the wall-altarpiece, the choir of nuns is occupied by a multitude of models. A garden of miniatures is placed onto the ground while generous models fly suspended in the air like a collection of clothes framed in coat racks.
Along the walls lay pictures-legends that trace the review of work in photography.


All photo's courtesy of Constance Guisset